Impact Church

Passionately serving God and His people

Category: July Devotional

The Dream Finisher

Psalms 105:18(NLT) until the time came to fulfill his dreams, the Lord tested Joseph’s character.

As a student of scripture and closet observer of the many expositors and expounders of them, perhaps no scriptural clause creates a veritable buffet of doctrine, theology, purpose, and understanding like this solitary, psalmic verse. Here, intertwined like the cords of a plaited rope – Creator, creation, and chaos run together – unraveling through life the strength, essence and purpose of each component and part.

Sandwiched strategically and voluminously between Abraham’s faith and Moses’ deliverance, stands a man who lived out extraordinary hope and inspiring perseverance. His place in the establishing of faith has implications and ripple effect throughout bible history, even to the salvific, eternal redemption of God’s chosen. And though few will ever be tested to the degree of severity in which Joseph’s faith was tested, be certain that all will be tested regarding the sincerity of their faith.

Like a porch light to the bugs at night, Joseph’s dream magnetized the envious naysayers of his day. When his ascending pedigree and posterity were openly declared among his brothers, invariably, relational chasms and beastly violence reached commonplace throughout his maturing years.

Though the path of Joseph’s dream and destination was interspersed with adversity and cruelty, the Author of his dream proved to be a far greater Finisher than all the desperate conspiracies and circumstances that sought to abort it.

For the dream, or prophetic words, that inspired Joseph’s life – words that propelled him, humbled him, protected him, and promoted him through numerous setbacks – outlived even him, as they contained words of foreknowledge regarding the inevitable formation of national Israel.

What some silently chafe at when trouble strikes is that there’s more at stake in trials than the mere wellbeing of the one tried. So that events that were ordained for Joseph to endure, in both Canaan and Egypt, were essential for Israel to be center stage in Messianic prophecy. For the coming of Christ and the creation of His redeemed Church were facilitated primarily on the shoulders of a bare few; a few that lived, not for themselves, but for the will of God.

Consider then the wisdom orchestrating the tumultuous years of Joseph’s rise to prominence. No one persists and pushes through difficulties as dark as those entertained by Joseph without possessing a faith that grasps something greater than themselves.

Surfacing quietly from the horrific rejections, accusations, injustices, neglect, wounding, dishonor, loneliness, imprisonment and separations Joseph experienced, four prominent truths arose:

  1. none of Joseph’s troubles were purposeless
  2. none resulted from his own improprieties
  3. none came without the allowances of God’s providence
  4. all things (even tribulations), worked together for his good!

To profit from life’s torrid trials, understand first that what’s valued greater than gold is the deeper faith and spiritual fruit that invariably flourishes, even when storms we experience are ratcheted to inexplicable levels.

While tempests of discouragement and turmoil of disappointment time and again ripped the external foliage from Joseph’s extraordinary dream, the character of a soon-to-be prince was being formed and deeply etched. As to integrity, the trustworthiness required in stewardship was groomed and proven dramatically in Potiphar’s house. And the leadership qualifications needed for the massive role he’d soon fill in Egypt were well satisfied through various other setbacks and testings.

How do we then engage the temptations and fiery trials that crop up in the path of every child of God? And what further purpose or benefit can the consuming fires of God provide us, even when we’re committed to Christ and obediently surrendering to His will?

Check out these three advisements when dreams are not fulfilled, and life doesn’t look anything like we thought it would:

— BE SURE—

  • Determine who and what’s unmovable, decide to be faithful, discern your true foe.
  • Focus on what transcends time; and the temporal things, even the troubles, find their effects lessened, either immediately or eventually.

— BE STILL—

  • Overcomers learn to rest more, not work more. More victories are won in prayer than on platforms and pulpits. Stay low and inside.
  • Only in patience do we review our priorities, and it’s then that we usually adjust and reduce them. And that’s ok. Be transformed.
  • The Holy Spirit is a better comforter than dancer. So receive comfort before we desire deliverance.

— BE SWEET—

  • To God. To oneself. To others. To antagonists.
  • It’s likely someone questioned your authenticity – so prove you, not them.
  • A rose doesn’t know that the suit to which it is pinned is actually worn by the grifter everyone despises. So be you. Do you. Be beautiful.
  • Rejoice in everything. I know, I don’t get it either, it sounds foolish. But He told us, so I’m on it. And if I’m going to grow in Him, I’ve got to believe Him in things I don’t like or understand.

And humorously, if a three-legged bar stool supports day after day the awkwardness of an overweight patron, surely these three practices can support a heavy heart overwhelmed by adversity and life’s unexpectedness.

Advertisements

Love for Outsiders

“But whatever house you enter, first say, ‘Peace to this house.’ And if a son of peace is there, your peace will rest on it; if not, it will return to you. And remain in the same house, eating and drinking such things as they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Do not go from house to house. Whatever city you enter, and they receive you, eat such things as are set before you. And heal the sick there, and say to them, ‘The kingdom of God has come near to you.'”Luke 10:5-9

Directly in the center of this evangelistic, apostolic narrative, just as Jesus is releasing and sending His followers to share His message with Gentiles for the first time, He introduces a theme that will become essential to the advancement of His Gospel. In the middle of explaining their authority over the enemy, commanding them to preach to sinners, and giving them power to heal the sick Jesus initiates the beginning declarations of a practice that seems inconsequential in this context but will become paramount to the fulfillment of His mission. This principle will become a place of refuge for Christians during persecution, a place of nourishment in times of famine, and a breeding ground for growth and increase. This principle is hospitality. As He sent them out to do His bidding, Jesus commanded them to stay in homes and eat meals with a “son of peace.”

If it were not for the remainder of the New Testament, it would be possible to skim past this instruction as unimportant or simply only necessary for this one occurrence. However as we read the Book of Acts and the Epistles to the early Church, it becomes glaringly clear that this practice was not background noise or peripheral to their mission, it was, in fact, foundational and indispensable.

The writer of Hebrews expounds upon these sentiments in verse 1 and 2 of chapter 13: “Let love of the brethren continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by this some have entertained angels without knowing it.” (Hebrews 13:1-2 NASB) In Romans 12, as the Apostle Paul gives us practical function for how our lives should look as claimers of salvation, he says, “Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints and seek to show hospitality” (Rom. 12:12–13). The Greek word for hospitality is “philozenia,” which comes from a compound of “love” and “strangers.” Otherwise stated, hospitality has its origin in the idea of welcoming and loving outsiders.

It is simple to understand the manifold advantage of gathering in this way with like-minded believers. However, I want to emphasize the importance of this principle as an asset in the Church’s evangelistic efforts. Increasingly, the most strategic turf on which to engage unbelievers with the good news of Jesus may be the turf of our own homes.

What if our homes were not just a place to dwell in or to reside? Not just a location to have bills sent to and a place to sleep? What if our homes were vital in the plan of God for the growth of His Kingdom in the earth? The New Testament announces that our living rooms can be sanctified. They can be sacred locations where the Holy Spirit ministers, serves, and draws mankind back to the Father. They can be strategic settings for welcoming and gathering unbelievers for the purpose of showing God’s love. They can be a breeding ground for enduring fruit and spiritual harvest.

My simple encouragement to the family of God is to create space in our living rooms and our lives to make converts and to make disciples. However, before you feel the need to get a microphone and stand on the street corner or seek ordination papers maybe what God is calling us to do is as fundamental as inviting friends, neighbors, coworkers, and family over to our house for dinner.

This may change the world.

Contentment

“I am not saying this because I am in need, for I have learned to be content whatever thecircumstances. I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry,whether living in plenty or in want. I can do all things through Him who gives me strength.”Philippians 4:11-13

Stomach bugs. Temper tantrums. All nighters. Hospital admissions. Potty training. Resident referee.

Motherhood isn’t always glamorous.

In fact there are days it’s just plain hard. And all the truthful, transparent mommas said, “Amen!” Paul says, however, in Philippians that he “learned the secret of being content in any and every situation.” Does this mean it is actually possible to be content in every season of our lives? Even the difficult ones? Is it possible to experience contentment even if our external circumstance is chaotic? Can we believe that motherhood is full of glory even when it isn’t glamorous? Could we dare to trust that God is at work in every detail of every day and that He wastes absolutely nothing?

My dear friends, contentment is ours for the taking. We can learn to access it daily. If Paul learned to be content from a prison cell then surely we can learn it while we are living in these glory-filled days of answered prayers. Many of us prayed for the days of marriage, motherhood, and ministry that we are living in right now. Therefore, let us refuse for the enemy to steal one inch of our beautiful, blessed ground. May the Lord not find us complaining and discontented. Let Him find us, instead, exceedingly thankful. He’s been so good to us.

That’s the key. He is good. Wildly, consistently, eternally GOOD.

Contentment has everything to do with what we know to be true about God and absolutely nothing to do with what is going on around us. Contentment, for a believer, begins inward and is independent of any external circumstance. We imagine that contentment is achievable only when our kids are obeying, the house is tidy, and our to-do list is checked off. But that’s a lieand I’m calling us up to clearer, higher, Kingdom-thinking. The Word tells us that contentment is all about Him and that He is our source of strength and joy. He is the ultimate, lasting refreshment we crave. This means we can be content on the ground our feet are planted on right this second. We don’t have to wait until another day to be content. We’re invited to experience it now.

This week, I pray, that we will be deeply satisfied with what we have and where we are. James1:17 says, “Every gift God freely gives us is good and perfect, streaming down from the Father of lights.” Look around. Take inventory. He has lavished us with generous gifts and we have much to be thankful for. Let’s choose, therefore, to celebrate what we have and stop focusing on what we don’t. He is with us and He is working all things together for our good and His glory. What He starts He’ll finish and His goodness will be weaved through every line on every page of our story, amen!?

“How” Shall We Sing

Psalms 137:4 How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?

Contextually, we see the Israelites perplexed and in a place unfit for their spiritual pedigree. After nearly two years of Babylonian besiegement, the worst has come to the most envied nation of the world. Continued sin and cold hearted rebellion has Jerusalem’s inhabitants exiled 500 miles away, confined to a heathen city steeped in paganism and idolatry.

And, as if the shame of captivity was insufficient judgment, the heathen required them to harmonize on the delightful songs of Zion and their King! (For worship, melodies and instrumentation from the Jewish Temple were known universally and universally unmatched.)

Thus the lament, “How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?”

Not, “how can we sing with a broken heart?”, but rather a question crafted and framed with incomprehensible grace came (unauthorized version of course!),”How shall we then sing from this strange and painful place? Not “can”, mind you, but “how” shall we sing. So, in some new way, we must, and will, sing! Yes, even in tears we will sing! For even in our backslidings, You never left us! Even in our abject worst, You walked with us! You gave promises and made covenant with us. And even in our well-deserved judgments, You cannot deny Yourself, nor excuse Yourself from bringing us to a glorious destiny! So even though this is uncharted territory, and this is painfully awkward in every way, we’ll return to our roots …and sing!”

Say what you will about Israel’s foolishness concerning sin and disobedience. They experienced what was prophesied, and divinely received what they deserved. But more importantly, we have to believe God’s loving covenant anchored them, even in unspeakable tragedy.

So what do we say to the circumstances of our own condition? Are we immune to tribulations? Read the rest of this entry »

Purity

6 In this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while, if need be, you have been grieved by various trials, 7 that the genuineness of your faith, being much more precious than gold that perishes, though it is tested by fire, may be found to praise, honor, and glory at the revelation of Jesus Christ, 8 whom having not seen you love. Though now you do not see Him, yet believing, you rejoice with joy inexpressible and full of glory, 9 receiving the end of your faith—the salvation of your souls. 1 Peter 1:6-9

This will not be your favorite devotional. It will be challenging to read at points. However, I believe it will be helpful and in the end encouraging, if received. Faith, like anything precious, will be tested. Simply because we are on pilgrimage in a fallen world, there will be instances, people, and occasions that are in opposition to our forward movement in Christ. Some arise quickly and immediately pass, while others linger longer and seem to nag constantly. The strain of this resistance is frequently difficult to navigate through and even to understand at times. It can cause even the strongest of believers to look to Heaven for answers and explanation.

In the middle of this experience, the scriptures include instruction that seems beyond capability. The Bible does not give us permission to be destroyed, deterred, or defeated by these tests. In fact, Paul declares that even in great contradiction we are “more than conquerors.” Furthermore, we are not even allowed to simply survive or manage these happenings. The writers of the New Testament on several occasions link two seemingly distant ideas; trials and rejoicing.  With the correct perspective and the proper placement of our trust, joy is the result of a child of God walking through tests.

This perspective begins with the understanding that trials are common for all people. No one is exempt or avoids this process. Rain, storms, and adversity are not punitive; they are a supposed and ordinary reality of our human existence. Jesus declares unequivocally that “in this world you will have tribulation.” The house built on the rock is not subject to differing weather or an atypical environment. It will be exposed to the same peril as the house built on sand. The result will just be different!

Additionally, our perspective must be fashioned by what we know concerning the goodness of our Father. He oversees what He purchased and He does not waste anything in our journey. He uses everything to bring about glory from our lives. Yes, even our trials.

Trials expose; not the pretty, decent parts of our life that we put out front for everyone to see but the deep parts that we purposefully endeavor to keep hidden. Trials provide heat and pressure. When those unwanted weights are applied, impurities are uncovered. Again, this is where trust is required. Our Father is not exposing contaminations for the sake of condemnation or denunciation. He unveils these carefully protected blemishes so He can heal and remove them. The removal of corruption makes us more like Jesus, more suitable for His service, and more prepared for the day we will stand before Him.

So, rejoice when you are tried. You are being purified! Your motivations, behaviors, and purposes are being refined. You are maturing and being perfected. Impurities are being removed and glory is being manifested! Your faith is being revealed as genuine and true!

Glory to God!

The Forgotten Doctrine of the Ascension

The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool. (Psalm 110:1

Every Christ-follower can attest to the significance of Jesus’ incarnation celebrated at Christmas. If enough songs of praise were not penned about His miraculous birth, hundreds more rightfully followed hailing His death, burial and resurrection and their unmistakable importance in the redemption of man.

But how many hymns or worship choruses have you sung recently (or how many sermons have you listened to, for that matter) celebrating the day Jesus returned to His rightful place at the right hand of the throne of God?

The ascension of Christ — when our Risen Lord majestically rose off the ground He created and disappeared into the clouds 40 days after walking out of a borrowed tomb — is one of the key pieces in the giant puzzle of God’s eternal plan of redemption!

The triumphant day when the Son of God, the Redeemer of fallen man, would take His seat of authority and power at His Father’s right hand had been anticipated and even prophesied throughout the pages of the Old Testament. And David’s short 110th Psalm was quoted by Jesus Himself some 1,000 years after it was penned and was also referenced by Luke, Paul and John later in the New Testament.

Interestingly, the oft-missed magnificence and magnitude of Christ’s ascension can be summed up in four common directional words: up, down, right and under. Most Christians get fired up about the first two and almost totally disregard the latter couple.

When the Savior slipped the grip of gravity and went up into the heavens, angels appeared and assured onlookers that the same Jesus who was taken up would also come back down one day. For two millennia, the Church has clutched that promise of the Second Coming of our Lord! To this day, we still await that “divine descension”!

But the real power of the ascension lies in what happened between the “up” and “down” and the absolute assurance of what will come ultimately. Jesus assumed the seated position of honor, power and authority at the right hand of God, essentially putting the exclamation point on His “It is finished!” declaration from the cross of Calvary! The ascension to the throne room of Heaven solidified the Deity of the Bethlehem-born son of a carpenter: Jesus proved Himself to be the Messiah, the victorious Seed of the woman promised where it all began in Genesis 3:15. “Tetelestai!” indeed!

One may wonder what could possibly be left after the Master has declared His work “finished.” For those of us who have staked our lives on the reliability of the Bible, the only part of redemption’s plan that needs to be unfolded is a foregone conclusion: Read the rest of this entry »

Holy Invitation

“When Jesus heard what had happened, He withdrew by boat privately to a solitary place. Hearing of this, the crowds followed Him on foot from the towns. When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, He had compassion on them and healed their sick.” Matthew 14: 13-14

On an exceptionally cold day in February 1988 a couple, and their three teenage sons, experienced the interruption of a lifetime. They were enjoying a typical Friday evening until there was a knock at the door and God disrupted the rhythm of their daily life in a dramatic way. A four-month-old baby was dropped off at their home with only a trash bag full of personal belongings. This ordinary family was suddenly presented with an extraordinary opportunity to be the hands and feet of Jesus and love a baby in need. I’m thankful they said yes to God’s wild plan for their lives; the baby was me, and this family became my very own.

Jesus was constantly interrupted. He was interrupted when speaking to crowds, conversing with His disciples, performing miracles, sleeping, traveling, and even while praying. In Matthew 14, His cousin and dear friend, John the Baptist had just been beheaded. Jesus tried to get away to mourn but the crowds followed Him there. When He saw the people the word says, “He had compassion on them, and healed their sick.” He then goes on to feed the multitude with the five loaves and two fish. Jesus was always attentive and available to the needs of those around Him.

I love making lists and am especially fond of my planner. I meticulously manage my time and prefer for my days to be both tidy and predictable. I cherish routine and am not a fan of spontaneity. I sport an invisible do not disturb sign while hustling to accomplish the many things on my to-do list. I am a goal setter and go getter. The reality, however, is that life doesn’t always cooperate with my to-do list.

As believers we should be good stewards of all that God has blessed us with- including our time. Yet God alone knows who we need to see, where we need to go, what we need to do, and who we are meant to speak with. So when things don’t go our way we have a choice. We can get annoyed or we can respond graciously knowing that our Heavenly Father is in control and we can trust Him.

When my husband tells our daughter to put her shoes on so we can go I’ve never once heard her say, “Well, dad, I’m kind of in the middle of something right now.” She’s never listed all that she hoped to accomplish that day like building a block tower, having a tea party, or coloring a picture of Sofia the First. She’s simply excited that her daddy asked her to go somewhere with him. She drops whatever she’s doing without a moment’s hesitation. Sweet friends, God extends holy invitations to us daily. You see interruptions are not obstacles; they are actually opportunities for us to release our plans and submit to His.

Welcoming interruptions may cause us to say yes when we receive an invitation to lunch last minute. It could urge us to answer that phone call when we’re in the middle of doing something else. We may stop to speak to a stranger even if we’re running late to an appointment. It means looking for God in every moment of our day and choosing to honor Him and not our schedule.

May we become increasingly more like Jesus, and more like my parents, welcoming interruptions and recognizing them as the precious opportunities they are to walk out the Lord’s glorious purpose for our lives. Life with Jesus as our pilot is an exciting adventure! We get to be willing participants of what God is actively doing in the earth. So if something doesn’t go as planned this week let’s remember His planning skills are second to none.

Stay With The Bunch

Two are better than one,…and a threefold cord is not quickly broken. Ecclesiastes 4:9-12

Ever seen an episode of “Wild Kingdom” or a National Geographic special? Think about the moments leading up to the lion pouncing on his prey. There is usually a herd of animals clambering near a waterhole, but the hungry lion doesn’t have his eyes on the potential smorgasbord. Instead, he is locked in on the antelope who has wandered off from the pack.

To avoid the unsavory scene about to unfold on your mental screen, let’s consider another one of nature’s lessons. Picture stepping into your kitchen and spotting a bunch of ripe, yellow bananas,…and a separate one that has already been pulled from the rest. Which one is about to get peeled?

What is true in the Serengeti and in your kitchen is often true in the church world as well. It’s the one who splits off from the rest that is an easier target for the predator. Now, after you get over the shock of having been just compared to a ravenous lion, consider who the Apostle Peter says is stalking isolated Christians who start to sever their ties to a local body of believers.

Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brotherhood throughout the world. (1 Peter 5:8-9, ESV)

Which believer do you think is an easier target for Satan: the one who is entwined with like-minded brothers and sisters in the weekly life of the congregation, or the one who shows up only for worship services on a somewhat regular basis? There is no wonder that Peter warned us that a big part of our resisting and standing steadfastly in our faith is to remember that we are not isolated members of Christ’s body but part of a worldwide brotherhood!

Jesus knew we needed to belong to something bigger than ourselves. If anyone ever could have accomplished His purposes as a Lone Ranger, certainly the Master could have done it. But He hand-picked what Millennials today would call a “posse,” a group of followers with whom He shared His life and ministry. He enjoyed intimate fellowship with His friends, investing in them and sending them out in pairs to proclaim His life-transforming Gospel!

Sounds like Jesus knew well the principle that the wise King Solomon laid out in Ecclesiastes 4. Two are better than one – not the worst philosophy when you’re considering that banana sandwich, by the way – …and a threefold cord is not quickly broken. Earlier, Solomon praised the countenance-lifting virtues of simple friendship and brotherhood, even when adversity arises. (Proverbs 17:17, 27:6,17)

What the two wisest men who have ever walked this earth knew is this: life is better lived in fellowship and loving relationship – Paul calls it “koinonia” in the Greek – with others who share the common bond of faith, love and devotion to the Godhead.

Sadly, many believers run from the church when they should be running to it. They hit the rough patches of life: Read the rest of this entry »

Not Yet

7:1 After these things Jesus was walking in Galilee, for He was unwilling to walk in Judea because the Jews were seeking to kill Him. 2 Now the feast of the Jews, the Feast of Booths, was near.

3 Therefore His brothers said to Him, “Leave here and go into Judea, so that Your disciples also may see Your works which You are doing. 4 For no one does anything in secret when he himself seeks to be known publicly. If You do these things, show Yourself to the world.” 5 For not even His brothers were believing in Him.

6 So Jesus said to them, “My time is not yet here, but your time is always opportune. 7 The world cannot hate you, but it hates Me because I testify of it, that its deeds are evil. 8 Go up to the feast yourselves; I do not go up to this feast because My time has not yet fully come.” (John 7:1-8)

Making Jesus and the Church attractive to the world and popular with everyone is a worldly temptation.

Jesus healed the lame man at the Pool of Bethesda in John 5. After 38 years of futile waiting, the man had no man to place him in the healing waters. Jesus sees him. Asks if he wants to be healed. It’s the Sabbath. The man believes and Jesus commands him to get up, take up his mat, and walk. 3 verbs. After that many years waiting, Jesus could have waited for another day to heal the man. He chose to heal him on the Sabbath, the 3rd miracle in the Gospel, to solicit a challenge with the Jewish leaders.

The next feast is Passover referenced in John 6. Jesus never made it to Jerusalem for that important feast. Instead, He spent His time around the Sea of Galilee, feeding 5,000 and walking on the water for His disciples. He told the Jews following Him, looking for another free meal, “I am the Bread of Life.” By the end of the chapter, Jesus offended the multitudes with His command to eat of His flesh and drink of His blood. At the sound of the hard sayings, all but the 12 disciples abandoned Him. Peter offered the reason why they stayed – even Judas; “”Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life. We have believed and have come to know that You are the Holy One of God.”

Right on the heels of Peter’s confession that Jesus is “the Holy One of God”, John takes us to the Feast of Booths, and Jesus’ unbelieving brothers. They offered 3 points of counsel:

#1 – 7:3 Therefore His brothers said to Him, “Leave here and go into Judea, so that Your disciples also may see Your works which You are doing.
MAKE A SHOW OF YOUR WORKS!
#2 – 7:4 For no one does anything in secret when he himself seeks to be known publicly. If You do these things, show Yourself to the world.”
PUBLICIZE YOURSELF TO THE WORLD
#3 – 7:5 For not even His brothers were believing in Him.
UNBELIEF LEADS TO WORLDLY COUNSEL

Long before radio, TV, social media, web sites, page views, followers, likes, etc. the temptation of impressing the world with spiritual truth has been present. Jesus’ brothers are an example of following the worldly counsel of unbelief.

Jesus had three responses to their sinful counsel: Read the rest of this entry »

Fashion By Grace

Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honor to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready. 8) And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white; for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints. 9) And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb. Rev. 21:7

Regardless the event attended, eventually the greater focus becomes, “What should I wear”? Few attend functions oblivious or unconcerned of attire; for the subtle pressures of peers, conformity and tradition demand attention to one’s dress. And if coolness or uncoolness is determined by the clothes one wears, then knowing what’s “in” must be a major concern.

And since the hipsters of fashion convince us that “clothes make the man”, we max the plastic to keep up with the commerce driven nuances of Madison Avenue. Interestingly, the marketing scheme of such constant change is genius. For if “clothes make the man”,… and they decide what’s cool,… and they make the clothes- then the garment industry is out like a bandit!

Oh ok.  But what’s your point?

Thanks for the segue!

Did you know we’ve been invited to the greatest marriage ever?

It’s true! It’s actually true! The King of kings has called us, not as attendants to His wedding, but as His Bride! You’re talking upgrade? We just got one!

I know, it’s preposterous! It’s beyond the human mind, I know, but yes, He’s chosen us to live and reign with Him forever! Married to our Redeemer! A love story beyond words! Cinderella’s slipper story is relegated now to the compost pile!

Flabbergasted? Absolutely yes! Flattered? What do you think! Gonna take Him up on the invite? You bet your last dollar we are!

But a wedding of this type requires some specially tailored clothes! Read the rest of this entry »