Impact Church

Passionately serving God and His people

Category: February Devotion 2017

Faith that Obeys

Hebrews 11:8
It was by faith that Abraham obeyed……

We are saved by faith; justified solely because of our belief in the finished work of Jesus. However, an element of faith that is frequently overlooked or discounted in our salvation is the obedience that associates with and accompanies faith. Dietrich Bonhoeffer, an influential theologian who was martyred under the Nazi regime states the relationship as thus, “faith is only real when there is obedience, never without it, and faith only becomes faith in the act of obedience.”

Obedience to Jesus is not a step of sporadic or inconsistent agreement with a command. Jesus is very specific in what He asks us to do. He does not invite us to simply follow a list of general principles or submit to a certain doctrine. Jesus does not present a plan for positive thinking or suggest seven simple steps to obedience. He invites us on a transformative, revolutionary adventure that begins with two simple words; “follow me.” This is the offer of a lifetime and if accepted, changes everything! It is a summons to walk with, alongside, and near the Savior. To surrender our agenda and itinerary and willingly walk where He walks, talk with whom He talks, and acquiesce to His desires many times at the sacrifice of our own.

This relationship is not a business agreement or constructed on the basis of demand or obligation. It is built on the most powerful of all foundations; love. Jesus encourages His disciples in the Gospel recorded by John that “If you love me, obey my commandments.” Our obedience is rooted deeply in our love for Him. Obedience is reasonable sacrifice because of His initial love for us. Authur W. Pink said that love is “a principle of action, and it expresses itself …. by deeds which please the object loved.” To obey God means to relinquish what we want and to choose to do what He asks.

There is no limit to obedience constructed on love. If there is a resistance to following Jesus, allow the words of Oswald Chambers to bring provocation and clarification: “The Lord does not give me rules, but He makes His standard clear. If my relationship to Him is that of love, I will do what He says …… If I hesitate, it is because I love someone I have placed in competition with Him, namely myself.”

Authentic, genuine faith obeys.

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Whether Abased or Abounding

“I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound…” (Philippians 4:12)

Sitting in a dark prison cell in Rome and writing to encourage the church he had planted at Philippi a few years before, the Apostle Paul probably couldn’t help but manage a wry smile at the irony. Here he was again, shackled and confined, for preaching the gospel.

Different town, different time. Same message, same result.

The last time he had been in Philippi, Paul and his cellmate, Silas, must have sounded like drunken fools singing praises to God with metal stocks around their ankles and with fresh blood running down their whip-lashed backs during the darkest hour of the night. You’ll remember the miraculous conversion story of the jailer that night (Acts 16).

“I have learned, in whatever state I am, to be content,” Paul writes from prison. “I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound.”

Contentment is a word — indeed, an attitude — we don’t hear much today. In our “bigger is better” capitalistic culture, the concept of contentment has become synonymous with settling. Why settle for an iPhone 5 when the new 7 is out? Why settle for driving a Chevy when you can spend a little more every month and cruise in a Lexus? Why settle for that 2013 model when the new ones have more gadgets?

Let’s face it. Even in a non-consumer-driven economy like the 1st Century, being at peace with what one has is just not natural. It’s a basic human desire to improve our station in life. That’s why Paul said he had to learn contentment whether in regard to his circumstances or material possessions. Here’s a man who had gone from an almost aristocratic, well-heeled, highly educated past to his present life as a habitual convict for the sake of the gospel.

What is the temptation when we are “abased” — suffering lack or poverty or simply enduring hard times? (Ever been there?) The tendency during such seasons of life is to think that God has forgotten us, that either He doesn’t see our need or, worse yet, that He doesn’t care what we’re going through or can’t do anything about it.

What about when we “abound” — just got that raise, everyone’s healthy, life is good? The temptation during such times of prosperity is for us to forget God! Scripture warns us to be careful not to let pride arise and think that you alone have brought blessing on yourself and your family (Deuteronomy 8:10-17).

The Apostle gives us the key to finding lasting joy, peace and contentment no matter what life brings our way: Read the rest of this entry »

Called To Courage

“Lord, if it’s you” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.” “Come,” He said. Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus.” (Matthew 14:28-29)

As a child I was afraid of the dark. In an effort to maintain complete transparency I’ll tell you- I slept in my mom and dad’s floor until I was thirteen years old. Unfortunately my daughter, now three, exhibits some of my same trepidation about the dark. Every night, like clockwork, I hear her cry into the monitor asking for “mommy” so paralyzed by fear that she won’t even get out of her bed. Once I go in and remind her I’m there the fear dissipates and she falls back asleep. I never turn on the light during this exchange. The darkness doesn’t change but my being with her in it changes the way she perceives it. When I’m there her fear of the unknown loses its power. The same was true for Peter in the passage noted above.

This portion of scripture occurs right after Jesus performs the miracle of feeding the five thousand with five loaves of bread and two fish. Jesus goes up on a mountaintop to pray and sends the disciples ahead of Him in the boat to the other side. Later Jesus is still on land when the boat begins to be tossed around by the wind a considerable distance from the shore. Jesus walks out to them on the water and while all twelve disciples see Jesus Peter is the only one that seizes the opportunity that surely was extended to each of them- to do something extraordinary with The Lord. Here’s the truth – Jesus has extraordinary things for each of us to be a part of; those things which are mind-blowing, miraculous, that defy all logic. Undeniably, this was one of those types of things. The invitation to come wasn’t limited to Peter. Jesus issues each of us the same invitation today.

Be aware, however, that our enemy means to keep us from accepting the invitation to come by entangling us with fear. Read the rest of this entry »